B. Rogers


ISEA2013 and ARC, through the University of NSW, present Brian Rogers.

Professor Brian Rogers is a Professor of Experimental Psychology, and Fellow and Tutor in Psychology, at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. His main field of research is vision and visual perception in humans, and he also works in the fields of computational vision, oculomotor systems and perceptual theory. His current research interests include motion parallax, cyclovergence, stereoscopic vision, perception and representation of surface orientation and curvature, the role of optic flow in heading judgments and the maintenance of balance.

Professor Rogers has published three books, Binocular vision and stereopsis (1995, Oxford University Press), Seeing in depth Vol 2 – Depth perception (2002, IPORTEUS), and Perceiving in Depth Vol 2 – Stereoscopic Vision (2012, Oxford University Press). He has also written five chapters for books, and has had more than 80 papers published in refereed journals.

During over thirty years as an academic, first at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, and more recently at the University of Oxford, he has built up one of the largest research groups working on human visual perception in the UK, and has created a set of well-equipped research laboratories which provide excellent facilities for work on binocular stereopsis, optic flow, motion perception and the recording of eye movements. He is a reviewer for many international journals, such as the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Nature, Vision Research, and others, and also for grant awarding authorities including N.A.T.O, The Wolfson Foundation, and N.I.H. (U.S.A.).

In addition to his academic position, Professor Rogers is a member of many professional societies in the UK and USA, including the Experimental Psychology Society, the Brain Research Association, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, and a Committee Member in the Science and Engineering Research Council, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. He is regularly invited to speak at symposia and conferences, as well as on TV and radio.